ICU Nurse

Intensive Care Completed Research

A vital branch of our Acute Care Department, the Intensive Care Clinical Research Team deliver national and international multi-centre studies in Intensive Care Medicine and related specialities, working to advance the care that we give to our patients.

The team also work closely with colleagues across the Trust and beyond to develop new and innovative research ideas that test new treatments especially in the fields of major trauma and neurosciences.

Please speak to the person treating you to find out if there is a research study that may be able to help you.

Studies in follow-up:

CIRCA: Critical Illness Related Cardiac Arrest

Although there is a national database of cardiac arrests that happen in hospital wards in most cases it does not include the ICU. This study records all cardiac arrests happening in ICU over the course of a year. The aim is to determine how commonly cardiac arrests happen in ICU and what the impact is on patients and families.

The study is funded by the Resuscitation Council (UK) and sponsored by the Intensive Care National Audit and Research Centre.

Project Details
Principal Investigator: Dr Matt Thomas
Study Completion: 01/11/2021
Local Ref: 4549

Completed Studies:

ORDIT

This national observational study aimed to define the pattern of multi-organ failure in trauma centres across the UK.

This study was run by Queen Mary’s University London.

For more information about this study, visit the CT4S website.

Project Details
Principal Investigator: Dr Matt Thomas
Study Completion: 04/06/2017
Local Ref: 3540

PHARLAP

This interventional trial compared different ways of using a ventilator in severe lung injury. It was stopped early in October 2017 after publication of a similar study raised concerns about safety of the new approach. Results from this trial will be available in due course.

The study was led by Monash University in Melbourne, Australia and the Australia and New Zealand Intensive Care Society (ANZICS).

For more information about this study, visit the Monash University website.

Project Details
Principal Investigator: Dr Matt Thomas
Study Completion: 13/10/2017
Local Ref: 3651

TEST-IT

This national multi-centre study tested the performance of a new way of diagnosing septicaemia (blood poisoning).

Sepsis is the term used to describe serious infections. Up to half of all hospitalised patients with sepsis may die. It is caused by microrganisms (microbes), such as bacteria, and one of the most important parts of treating patients with sepsis is to give them the right antibiotics as soon as possible to treat the underlying infection. Many different microbes can cause sepsis. Currently the only way to find out for sure which one to target in any particular patient is to wait for it to grow in a laboratory from a sample of their blood, or other samples (culture).

As it takes at least 24-48 hours to grow in the laboratory, doctors choose 'best guess' antibiotics that can treat a lot of different microbes before they know which one would be the best fit. These are not always the right antibiotics for that particular individual, and sometimes patients only get the right treatment once there is a result from the laboratory.

Randox Ltd has developed a new bedside device based on technology that is able to identify bacteria in patients' blood within just one hour. Looking only for characteristic fragments of over 40 different microbes means that doctors’ decisions about which treatment to give patients will not need to wait for over a day for the microbe to grow in a laboratory. This allows treatments to be better targeted from a much earlier stage. The aim of this study was to investigate how well the new TEST-IT is able to identify microbes in comparison to blood culture, which is currently the best method of measurement (gold standard).

This study was run by the Northern Ireland Clinical Trials Unit (NICTU) and was funded by Innovate UK.

For more information about this study, visit the NICTU website.

Project Details
Principal Investigator: Dr Matt Thomas
Study Completion: 28/02/2018
Local Ref: 4006

65 Trial

The 65 Trial asked if reducing the dose of medication to support blood pressure (vasopressors) in shock in patients over 65 will produce a better outcome to standard practice.

This national multi-centre study was run by the Intensive Care National Audit and Research Centre (ICNARC) and funded by the National Institute of Health Research (NIHR).

Project Details
Principal Investigator: Dr Matt Thomas
Study Completion: 16/03/2019
Local Ref: 4028

A-STOP

This trial was a multi-centre prospective diagnostic test accuracy study assessing the performance of three rapid tests for fungal infection. The accuracy of these tests was compared and the optimal test (or combination) identified. The emphasis being on their ability to rule out infection. Although fungal infection, most often with Candida, is rare (0.6% of patients in UK ICUs) the mortality is high, hence the importance of getting the diagnosis right.

The study was run by the Northern Ireland Clinical Trials Unit and is funded by the National Institute of Health Research.

For more information about this study, visit the NIHR website.

Project Details
Chief Investigator: Dr Matt Thomas
Study Completion: 31/03/2021
Local Ref: 4111

ADAPT-Sepsis

This trial is a UK wide multi-centre randomised trial to determine whether antibiotic treatment protocols, based on daily monitoring of C-Reactive Protein (CRP) or procalcitonin (PCT), safely allow a reduction in duration of therapy. The overall duration of antibiotic treatment for infection is often not certain because clinical signs and microbiology tests are not useful to monitor a patient’s response. Proteins in blood – CRP and PCT – are often raised in sepsis and fall with antibiotic treatment. They provide an opportunity to personalise the duration of antibiotics and to provide population benefit.

The study is run by the Warwick Clinical Trials Unit and is funded by the National Institute for Health Research.

Project Details
Principal Investigator: Dr Matt Thomas
Study Completion: 30/04/2021
Local Ref: 4110

A2B

This is a randomised trial of three different sedative drugs used to help patients who need support from a ventilator. The aim is to find out whether minimising the use of the standard drug (propofol) means people spend less time on the ventilator, if this is safe and if this represents value for money.

The study is funded by the Health Technology Assessment Programme of the NIHR and is sponsored by the Academic and Clinical Central Office for Research (ACCORD) in Edinburgh.

Project Details
Principal Investigator: Dr Matt Thomas
Study Completion: 31/07/2021
Local Ref: 4308

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About Research & Innovation

NBT Researcher

Find out more about our research and how we're working to improve patient care.

Contact Research & Innovation

Research & Innovation
North Bristol NHS Trust
Floor 3, Learning & Research Centre
Southmead Hospital
Westbury-on-Trym
Bristol, BS10 5NB

Telephone: 0117 4149330
Email: research@nbt.nhs.uk